Signs a loved one may have dementia this Christmas

Health chiefs have warned that forgetting to turn on the oven for Christmas dinner yesterday could be a warning sign that a loved one has dementia.

Not remembering names, gifts, or the way you walked around a relative’s house may also indicate that an elderly friend or family member is suffering from amnesia.

More than 900,000 Britons and 7 million Americans are believed to have dementia, and rates are expected to nearly double over the next two decades.

It comes as the NHS today announced plans for paramedics to assess hundreds more elderly people for the condition as part of a catch-up drive after diagnoses fell during the pandemic.

The NHS says not remembering names, gifts or a way to get around a relative’s house could also be a sign that a friend or family member is suffering from amnesia.

In advice released today, the NHS said if a relative, particularly those over 65, forgot to turn on the oven for a Christmas turkey, they could be ‘suffering from the early stages of dementia’.

Forgetting the names of loved ones to the point of being “embarrassing” and not bringing a gift from a distant relative, such as a niece or nephew, can be a telltale sign.

Other signs include disorientation in a new environment — such as a hotel or a relative’s home — which can see people with dementia getting disoriented, disoriented, and walking into the wrong bedroom.

Professor Alistair Burns, NHS England’s national medical director for dementia, said: ‘If you notice over the festive period that someone is experiencing symptoms, please encourage them to visit their GP for an assessment – the earlier someone is seen, the more support the NHS can provide. Faster. they.’

Broader signs of dementia include amnesia – such as remembering past events much more easily than recent events.

Problems with thinking or reasoning, finding it difficult to follow conversations or television programs and feeling anxious, depressed, or angry about memory loss are also symptoms of dementia.

Those who experience these symptoms are advised to see a general practitioner. Getting an early diagnosis can help get the right treatment and support.

There is currently no cure for dementia but treatment includes medication and therapy.

The latest NHS data shows more than 450,000 people in England had been diagnosed with dementia by September – an increase of 2.8 per cent in one year.

But the Alzheimer’s Society reports that there are more than 900,000 people living with dementia in the UK today, meaning many are undiagnosed, and the total is expected to rise to 1.6 million by 2040.

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common type of dementia, affecting between 50 and 75 percent of sufferers.

In the United States, it is estimated that there are 7 million people with dementia. The number is expected to reach 12 million over the next two decades.

It comes as the NHS today launched a ‘diagnostic engine’ for dementia in 14 institutions across England, including parts of London, Birmingham and Oxford.

In an effort to spot cases of dementia that have gone undetected during the pandemic, paramedics will provide face-to-face assessments to undiagnosed care home residents.

There has been a significant drop in rates of dementia diagnoses during the Covid crisis, leading to concerns of more people living with the condition without access to appropriate support and advice.

But experts say the new trial will help reduce the number of missed cases.

As part of the local dementia campaigns, GPs will share a list of residents in care homes without a diagnosis of dementia.

Staff involved in the pilot program will check with the care home to see if those listed have memory problems and a full face-to-face assessment will be given to residents.

They will then review the patient’s medication use, as well as talk to friends and family to determine if they may have dementia.

Prof Burns said: ‘The pandemic has had a normalizing effect on the number of people diagnosed with dementia, with older people seeing fewer people to protect themselves from Covid.

The NHS is determined to ensure that those who develop dementia are diagnosed during the pandemic as it will open doors to further support for people and their families living with this heart-breaking condition.

There are so many things we can do in the NHS to look after and support people if they get a diagnosis, and most importantly there is support for their families and carers too.

So if over the festive period you notice someone developing symptoms, please encourage them to visit their GP for an assessment – the earlier someone is seen, the faster the NHS can provide support.

In other related news…

Hundreds of elderly Britons will be screened for dementia through a new pilot scheme in 2023

Georgia Harrison asks Love Island to help find her grandfather, who has dementia, after he goes missing on Christmas Day.

The study finds that one in 10 cigarette smokers in their 40s suffer cognitive decline – but quitting can reverse the damage.

What is dementia?

Dementia is an umbrella term used to describe a group of neurological disorders

Dementia is an umbrella term used to describe a group of neurological disorders

global concern

Dementia is an umbrella term used to describe a group of progressive neurological disorders (those affecting the brain) that affect memory, thinking and behaviour.

There are many different types of dementia, the most common being Alzheimer’s disease.

Some people may have a combination of dementias.

No matter what type is diagnosed, each person will experience dementia in their own unique way.

Dementia is a global concern but appears most often in wealthier countries, where people are more likely to live to an old age.

How many people are affected?

The Alzheimer’s Society reports that there are more than 900,000 people living with dementia in the UK today. This is expected to increase to 1.6 million by 2040.

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common type of dementia, affecting between 50 and 75 percent of sufferers.

In the United States, it is estimated that there are 5.5 million people with Alzheimer’s disease. A similar percentage is expected to rise in the coming years.

As a person ages, the risk of dementia increases.

Diagnosis rates are improving but it is believed that many people with dementia remain undiagnosed.

Is there a cure?

Currently there is no cure for dementia.

But newer drugs can slow its progression, and the earlier it is caught, the more effective treatments will be.

Source: Alzheimer’s Association

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